RIAM’s La finta giardiniera, Beckett Theatre, 16/1/18 – Review

RIAM’s La finta giardiniera, Beckett Theatre, 16/1/18 – Review

I confess: I went to La finta Giardiniera at the Beckett Theatre for Mozart’s music. It was a students’ show, yes, but you can’t have everything. Little I knew I was in for a treat.

The production presented promising students from RIAM, and was made in collaboration with IADT students for hair and make up, while the creative team was a professional one.

La finta giardiniera makes for an instantly captivating listening, like a succession of pop songs from the eighteenth century. The score contains in nuce Mozart’s genius, while the libretto is full to the brim with facetious rhymes.

I disagree with William Mann’s dismissive opinion of the libretto (“feeble, stereotyped and […] incompetent”) as a distinction needs to be made between the plot and the verses. On the thin canvas of the ludicrous plot, the libretto manages to paint all the painful shades of unreciprocated love: jealousy, desire, madness, although in a formally comic guise. What’s more, the Italian verses of the libretto are moulded with exceeding metrical skill.

Veteran director Ben Barnes did a dazzling job in adapting this work. Both the directorial choices and the movement director’s (Libby Seward) ones were spotless, bringing out and magnifying the surreal nature of divertissement of this opera. On the other hand, the English of the surtitles could have been more literally faithful to the original.

Conductor Andrew Synnott drew out of the students’ orchestra a very enjoyable rendition of the score, particularly energetic in the aria of playfully metatheatrical flavour “Dentro il mio petto io sento”, sung with confidence by Vladimir Sima.

Clodagh Kinsella was a perfect Sandrina, with great stage presence, good acting and an interesting colour to her voice. James McCreanor displayed a sweet Mozart tenor voice. Eimear McCarthy Luddy was a very good Ramira, in an untangling of the trousers role’s ambiguity where the original “Ramiro” becomes the gay suitor of Arminda. Dylan Rooney (Nardo) boasted a deep baritone voice.  

Both Corina Ignat (Arminda) and Ecaterina Tulgara (Serpetta) demonstrated striking acting  and astounding vocal control, with the second one leaving a particularly strong impression in my mind.

*Picture: Vladimir Sima, James McCreanor, Corina Ignat, Ecaterina Tulgara and Dylan Rooney in RIAM’s “La finta giardiniera”. Photo by Colm Hogan.

First staging of “The Sleeping Queen” by M.W. Balfe coming up at NCH.

First staging of “The Sleeping Queen” by M.W. Balfe coming up at NCH.

Not many people outside of the opera world know that the song “I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls” (made popular, among others, by Enya) is, in fact, a ballad from an opera, The Bohemian girl (1843), written by the most prominent Irish operatic composer of the past, as well as of the Victorian period: Michael William Balfe.

Now largely fallen into oblivion, in his days Balfe truly enjoyed an international career – first as an opera singer and then as a composer – between Italy, France and England. His operas were so successful that they were staged across the globe, from New York to Sidney.

His only operetta, The sleeping queen (1864), will receive its first modern staging in its complete form (arias and dialogue) on Monday 22nd of January, in the John Field Room at the National Concert Hall. The show, directed by Peter McDermott, is presented by DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama and the producer, Una Hunt, will give a short pre-opera talk.

There are only a handful of recordings of entire operas by the Irish composer. For a sample of the eclecticism of his music, on iTunes you can listen to two very different operas: the aforementioned The Bohemian Girl, a ballad opera (typical of the English tradition), and Falstaff (a live concert recording from 2008), an Italian style opera, visibly drenched in Rossini and Donizetti’s orchestral and vocal lines.
To book tickets, visit https://www.nch.ie/Online/The-Sleeping-Queen-22Jan18.

*Picture: Tenor Oisín Ó Dálaigh and soprano Catherine Donnelly. Photo by Conor Mulhern.

Cast

Maria Dolores, Queen of Leon –  Catherine Donnelly, soprano
Donna Agnes, Maid of Honour –  Sarah Kilcoyne, mezzo soprano
Philippe D’Aquilar, a young exile –  Oisin O Dalaigh, tenor
His Excellency, the Regent –  Kevin Neville, baritone

Vocal director, Stephen Wallace
Musical director, Una Hunt
Directed by Peter McDermott
Produced by Una Hunt

DIT Sleeping Queen FLYERx2 A5

The Big Bang! – Concert review (9/1/18)

The Big Bang! – Concert review (9/1/18)

This is an extract of my review published on Bachtrack:

The biggest stigma associated with opera in Ireland is not that it is an elitist art form, but that it is not “Irish”, and that is doesn’t belong to Irish culture, more of a recent import, like pasta, or avocado. This is, of course, not true and can be proven wrong in a number of ways, from noting the names of internationally renowned 19th- and 20th-century Irish opera composers and singers, to the fact that major European operas have had an audience in Ireland for at least the past couple of centuries.

Whatever one may believe, the launch of Irish National Opera on Tuesday tells us one thing for sure: opera has a bright future in Ireland. Continue reading on Bachtrack.

IRISH NATIONAL OPERA 2018 PROGRAMME

Thomas Adès’s Powder Her Face
Irish National Opera will open its first season on Saturday 24 February 24th 2018 with leading contemporary composer Thomas Adès’s darkly comic, sexually-charged chamber opera, Powder Her Face. This pioneering work by one of the key compositional voices of our time will be seen in a co- production with NI Opera.

Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro
The company’s first full-scale production will be Mozart’s comic masterpiece The Marriage of Figaro, directed by Patrick Mason. The title role is sung by the New Zealand-born Samoan baritone Jonathan Lemalu with mezzo-soprano Tara Erraught as Susanna, the object of his desire. Erraught returns to Ireland fresh from her acclaimed 2017 debut at New York’s Metropolitan Opera. The Marriage of Figaro will be seen at the Gaiety Theatre, Dublin, and the National Opera House, Wexford, from Friday 13 April.

Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice
Irish National Opera presents Gluck’s moving telling of the myth of the great musician Orfeo rescuing his wife Euridice from the Underworld in association with Galway International Arts Festival from Monday 23 July, in co-production with United Fall. The stylish mezzo soprano Sharon Carty stars in a production directed by leading dance theatre director Emma Martin.

Donnacha Dennehy and Enda Walsh’s The Second Violinist
Irish National Opera will takes its award-winning production of Donnacha Dennehy’s The Second Violinist — a co-production with Landmark Productions, written and directed by Enda Walsh — to London’s Barbican Centre for three nights from Thursday 6 September.

You can read my review of this production here.

Offenbach’s The Tales of Hoffmann
The company’s new chamber version of Offenbach’s opéra fantastique The Tales of Hoffmann — an operatic take on the weird and wonderful Gothic world of German writer ETA Hoffmann — will tour to ten venues across the country from Friday 14 September. Soprano Claudia Boyle will be returning home to Ireland for the production fresh from the Salzburg Festival, where she is singing in Hans Werner Henze’s The Bassarids. Tom Creed directs.

Bartók’s Bluebeard’s Castle
Irish National Opera opens its first partnership with the Dublin Theatre Festival on Friday 12 October, in a presentation of Hungarian composer Béla Bartók’s operatic masterpiece, the broodingBluebeard’s Castle. It is directed by Enda Walsh who will, for the first time, direct an opera from the existing repertoire.

Verdi’s Aida
Irish National Opera last offering of 2018 opens on Saturday 24 November. It is an epic production in Dublin’s largest theatre, the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre, of Verdi’s most spectacular opera, Aida. The powerful Dublin soprano Orla Boylan stars in the title role, and the production is directed by Michael Barker-Caven.

 

For more details on Irish National Opera 2018 programme and to buy tickets check www.irishnationalopera.ie